Scientists trace the brain's decision-making process: How the brain takes any decision, scientists have discovered the process: Study

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Scientists trace the brain's decision-making process: In a recent study, scientists have found that area/area of ​​the brain where important decisions related to their choice are taken. In the language of science, that area of ​​the brain is called RSC ie Restrosplenial Cortex. Scientists found during their research that this is the area of ​​the brain, which we use to choose the options of our choice. Meaning what we like, what we don't like, all this is determined by this RSC.

Scientists trace the brain's decision-making process: In a recent study conducted by researchers from the University of California, scientists have found the area of ​​the brain where important decisions related to their choices are made. In the language of science, that area of ​​the brain is called RSC ie Restrosplenial Cortex. Scientists found during their research that this is the area of ​​the brain, which we use to choose the options of our choice. Meaning what we like, what we don't like, it all is determined by this SSC. For example, if you think of it as if you have to go for dinner today, then your options may also include choosing the restaurant for dinner. Not only this, but we also update RSC with information that how was the taste of the soup and pasta served in the restaurant and how much we enjoyed it.

The findings of this study have been published in the journal 'Neuron'.

What the experts say

The study, led by Ryoma Hattori and Professor Takaki Komiyama, from the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of California, details how dynamic notifications are processed.

According to Ryoma Hattori, 'In a study done on rats, we found that the RSC of its brain acts as a permanent cell of choice information.'

Keep brain healthy like this

Researchers from Aarhus University in the US found in a new study that a balanced diet reduces the risk of bleeding or clotting in the brain.

The findings of this study, conducted by the US Public Health Department, have been published in the journal 'Stroke'. It has been said that consuming more vegetarian foods and less consumption of non-veg (non-vegetarian) foods is good for health.

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