Queen Elizabeth II used a very special phone, and only two people could call her

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The world is in shock after news of Queen Elizabeth II's death broke on Thursday. Thousands gathered outside Buckingham Palace around the United Kingdom singing "God Save the Queen" and mourning the death of the country's longest-reigning queen. Queen Elizabeth II guided her country through times of social, economic, and political upheaval, from the breakup of Britain's colonial empire to Brexit. Throughout her reign, she maintained dignity all around her. Not only this, but her security was also quite mysterious. Even the phone hacking scandal in the country could not achieve anything on it. The reason was her special phone.

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According to Express UK, the Queen had a phone with a "highly encrypted anti-hacking mechanism". The phone has a special mechanism that was installed by the Samsung model, the MI6 to prevent hackers from accessing any details of their personal conversations.

While the late Queen kept in touch with all members of the royal family, only two contacts had "instant access" to this phone. They were her daughter, Princess Anne, and her racing manager, John Warren.

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If you're wondering why her racing manager was one of the two people she talks to the most, it's easy. Warren is the son-in-law of an old friend, the late Earl of Carnarvon. Interestingly, the late Earl had the manor used for Downton Abbey.

As for John Warren, he looked after Queen Elizabeth's horses, their training, and other things. Given the late Queen's love for horse racing, it was no surprise that she had made sure John Warren could visit her anytime.

As far as adopting new technology was concerned, Rani was always ahead of the times. According to reports, Queen Elizabeth II opened her Facebook account in 2017. But it was a private account. Also, during the COVID-19 pandemic, she was often seen conducting engagements and meetings through Zoom.

The death of Queen Elizabeth II has left the United Kingdom in shock. Her presence will be remembered by his subjects.