U.N. council extends inquiry into Syria toxic gas attacks

43

 The U.N. Security Council approved on Thursday a one-year extension of an international inquiry to determine blame for chemical weapons attacks in Syria, paving the way for a showdown over how to punish those responsible. 

Russia had said it wanted the inquiry to be broadened to look more at the "terrorist chemical threat" within the region, and the resolution to renew the mandate included language to reflect that request. 

The 15-member council unanimously adopted the U.S.-drafted resolutionThe inquiry by the United Nations and the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, or OPCW, set up by the council a year ago, has already found that Syrian government forces were responsible for three chlorine gas attacks and that Islamic State militants had used mustard gas. 

Syria's government has denied its forces had used chemical weapons during the country's nearly six-year-old civil war. 

France, Britain, the United States and other council members have said that after the renewal of the inquiry on Thursday, they hope to start negotiations on a draft resolution to punish those blamed for the attacks, likely with U.N. sanctions. 

But Russia, an ally of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, has said the inquiry's findings cannot be used to take action at the U.N. Security Council and that the Syrian government should investigate the accusations. 

Last week, the OCPW's executive body voted to condemn the use of banned toxic agents by the Syrian government and Islamic State militants. 

Chlorine's use as a weapon is prohibited under the Chemical Weapons Convention, which Syria joined in 2013. If inhaled, chlorine gas turns to hydrochloric acid in the lungs and can kill by burning lungs and drowning victims in the resulting body fluids. 

Syria's administration has denied its powers had utilized synthetic weapons amid the nation's almost six-year-old common war. 

France, Britain, the United States and other committee individuals have said that after the restoration of the request on Thursday, they want to begin arrangements on a draft determination to rebuff those rebuked for the assaults, likely with U.N. sanctions. 

Be that as it may, Russia, a partner of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, has said the request's discoveries can't be utilized to make a move at the U.N. Security Council and that the Syrian government ought to examine the allegations. 

A week ago, the OCPW's official body voted to denounce the utilization of banned poisonous specialists by the Syrian government and Islamic State activists. 

Chlorine's utilization as a weapon is denied under the Chemical Weapons Convention, which Syria participated in 2013. In the event that breathed in, chlorine gas swings to hydrochloric corrosive in the lungs and can slaughter by blazing lungs and suffocating casualties in the subsequent body liquids. 

Syria consented to demolish its compound weapons in 2013 under an arrangement expedited by Moscow and Washington. The Security Council sponsored that arrangement with a determination that said in case of resistance, "counting unapproved exchange of synthetic weapons, or any utilization of compound weapons by anybody" in Syria, it would force measures under Chapter 7 of the U.N. Sanction. 

Section 7 manages assents and approval of military compel by the Security Council. The body would need to embrace another determination to force focused on assents – a travel boycott and resource solidify – on individuals or elements connected to the assaults.